3.6 turbo, 911, 911 Porsche, Bilstein suspension, Imagineauto, Personnel, Porsche, turbo

A Long Over due update…what do you drive?

Ok, Ok, I’ll post about it. Reese’s cups in hand and a side of milk standing by I thought I would go ahead and update the question, what do you drive? I drive a 1989 80K mile Ford Grand Marquis 🙂 Well, that is my winter car…Oh wait, it is a 2004 Infinity G35 coupe, my company car….Oh! the Porsche?

Upon the close of the company we had a 3.6T that was very sick and not anyone’s priority. A complete cluster between the company that sublet the work to us and the payments or lack of created a rather somber out look for this little jewel. I knew that the state of affairs left no other choice but to release the love of my life, the 997TT. That meant a new steed was needed in my stall. Besides that I really didn’t feel like hoofing it everywhere and I knew the boys would complain if we walked instead of drove.  So I set out to contact the owner, over and over. I guess this started in Oct of ’08. In March I received and email that was rather cryptic then a follow up call from the dad. It was one of the phone calls that the hair on the back of your neck stand straight up and you literally become frozen in words and Uhhh becomes the most intelligent thing you can manage out. It was explained to me that the owner and the son of the man calling was murdered in the fall for his Mitsubishi Lancer! Really! A Lancer??! What the hell is a matter with people? I was told that he didn’t want the car and if I wanted to make an offer he would entertain it. I quickly declined and said I would feel weird about doing such a thing. I was greeted with a retort that was simple but effective, I don’t want it so buy it if you do and enjoy it…My son would have liked that. Hairs on my arm standing up in rows like an army regiment headed in to battle I quivered a number past my lips to which he agreed.

So now the good part. What the hell had I bought? Many odd things about this car cropped its head other than the fact it wouldn’t accelerate past a sleeping turtle or road kill. It carried 993 door frames, 993 glass, 993 sunroof, 993 handles and a 993 cowl and windshield wipers. 6 Speed 993TT tranny with the AWD set in place. Big brakes, a healthy motor and a paint job that was as good as they could come. The car had 29K, didn’t run to save its life, no heat, no AC, the fuel gauge didn’t work and who needed a speedometer? Interior panels missing as well as the under carriage covers, wheel wells etc. However it had a really cool TV in the rearview mirror to watch Bad Boys on. LOL, pluuuease.

We set the car on the dyno and run after run the car spit and sputtered and I sat listening as Chris made adjustment after adjustment. Finally like Dr House with a Eureka moment I said hang on. I climbed in the back of the motor and pulled the covers to read the timing…at 5K RPM the timing was 54 degrees. Errr yes, 54 degrees. What is the average you say? Well, thanks Bob for the question. It should be 19-22ish. The good thing is was so advanced because it probably kept the motor from exploding all over the place. I reset it and pulled this pig off of the dyno and around the block…Can you say giddy up? I could because this thing ran like a stripped arse ape!

As summer progressed the boys and I spent every day on it bringing it up to speed, wheels, a clip here and there, the paint restored and any little detailed that didn’t work up to speed. We fixed the AC, the heat and I pulled the intake off and fixed what the hacks had done before me. We pulled the on board computer and graphed a real boost and AFR gauge and gave the car a new life….Oh and I got rid of the open exhaust and ran a cat with a muffler bypass. New suspension and lowering springs, sway bars,  bigger turbo, boost controller and new wastegate. We added more fuel with one of my fuel heads and I modified the warm up regulator and lowered the control pressure. Larger injector lines and pulled off all the air injection crap. The motor has large ported heads, increased CR and custom cams and powdered by an electromotive HPX.

By mid summer I was exactly where I wanted to be with the car. Lots of work but right back to my roots and having fun with it. After that, well many around town know of the “red Porsche” that has taunted and ate their lunch 🙂  

PorschePhD

911, 911 Porsche, Porsche, Porsche 997, porsche body kit, porsche performance, Porsche radaitor, Uncategorized

997 Center Radiator install

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Ok, we are back after a mandatory blog vacation issued by the boss! Oh wait, that was me and I really was just slacking. So time to stop slacking and post some of what’s been in the shop!

 

 In normal iA fashion nothing should ever be left stock. In this case we take a 997S and add a center radiator. We install and sell these as a whole unit. So whether you are having a shop install it or doing it yourself the kit comes with everything you need. Radiator, lines, bolts, screws, plastic shroud, plastic diverter and so on. It is a pretty nice kit that is great for any 997 headed to the track or someone that simply wants to drop the water temperatures down in a cost effective way. Yes, I did say cost effective. I know that seems foreign to use Porsche and Cost Effective in the same sentence.

 

dsc00934 The first thing is to remove the bumper. The install should take about 4 hours maybe more if you are a weekend warrior and tripping over that 6 pack of Budweiser on the floor with your buddies. You will want to remove the plastic cover around the latch area. This simply pulls up and around the latch. You will want to also remove the left and right turn signals. Next you will want to remove the torx. You will want to grab T30 and a T20. There are both sizes used in various positions. Pull the torx along the top of the bumper. Next remove the ones in the turn signal area and then work your way under the car and remove all the torx around the lower edge. Next you will want to remove the inner fender liners. I have seen guys do it without removing them, but to be honest to struggle around their placement is a pain and especially if this is your first and only time…it is easier to remove them. There should be 4 torx in the well then I believe two under the car. I always get these mixed up between the turbo and NA cars.

 

Once you have these all remove you will want to look in-between the fender and bumper just inside the trunk area. There is a blade that pushes like a latch, it mates the bumper and fender together to suck in the body line around the headlight. You can remove these by using a pick and grabbing the hole that is pictured in the jpg. Just tug on the piece. It may seem stubborn but it will come out. Next make sure that you disconnect the plug in the passenger side wheel well by the radiator. The last thing to remove is the headlight washer line. You can do this by pinching in the clip and pulling the hose out. This is located on the driver side on the inside of the bumper just forward of the turn signal.

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Now pull the bumper off. Make sure you don’t scratch it!! You have now exposed the front bumper support. It requires a 17mm socket on each of the bolts. Remove these and simply pull the support off. Next you will want to pull the plugs in the radiators on the side. In each radiator there is a factory block off plug in each end. This is so that you can add the center radiator easily and don’t have to change the hoses or the units in order to cool things down! As you can see from the pictures you just pull the clips and then the plugs can be pulled out. Once this is done you can now install the rear shroud. The kit comes with the bolts and nuts to attach it to the body. Grab the hoses and install these. There will be a left and a right hose to connect to the proper ports. I use a little silicone grease around the o-ring. This ensures that the hose drops into the neck and the outer clip seats fully. If it doesn’t and you do not hear a click then the hose will pop out under pressure.

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Now install the radiator. Same theory applies here with the silicone grease on the o-ring. This will help slip the hose in to the neck of the radiator. Once you have these in then install the lower support with the 6mm bolts from the kit. Next install the outer shroud. Suck the coolant system down and reinstall the bumper

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Audi, Auto Enthusiast, dyno run, Porsche, racing, turbo

Breaking News! Dyno Day a Hit!

Great turn out Saturday at the ImagineAuto Dyno Day. Thanks to all who entered, attended, helped with and cheered on the cars. A nice variety of makes were represented: Mitsubishi Evo 9’s, Subaru STI Wagon, Corvettes, Turbo Mustang, Dodge SRT 8 Wagon, Audi S4, and a couple of Porsches. I actually was the last one standing when it came to grilling burgers for everyone and after the first couple hockey pucks, actually got into the groove. It was hard to tell though whether the smoke smell I carried away with me on Saturday was from the grill or the Mustang that was dyno’d!
A little excitement ensued when Brian Huff showed up in his 1988 Mustang 2.3 Turbo. Once it was strapped down on the dyno and some power was put down, it gave off quite a large amount of smoke. After iA made absolute certain that Brian understood that there was a possibility it was going to explode, the car actually put out an impressive 306 HP. Not bad considering the turbo, the motor and everything in between was in jeopardy of blowing up! Of course iA’s resident 6 year old was very disappointed that the explosion didn’t actually occur!
Below are the HP results:
Robert Lemmon – 2001 Mitsubishi Evo 9 – 342 HP
Richard Moncayo – 2006 Mitsubishi Evo 9 – 324 HP
Justin Mutch – 1998 Subaru STI Wagon – 227 HP
Joe Moncada – 2007 Corvette – 373 HP
Brian Huff – 1988 Mustang 2.3 Turbo – 306 HP
Mike Jacobs – 1989 930 Porsche – 488 HP
Jeff Parlato – 1999 Corvette – 354 HP
Peter Granat – 2001 Porsche 996TT – 271 HP
Dale Berry – 2006 Dodge Magnum SRT8 Wagon – 440 HP
Charles Waters – 2000 Audi S4 – 270 HP
Remember that ImagineAuto has the AWD Mustang Dyno available every day if you are interested in challenging your friend to a run-off. We also are pleased to offer car club discounts on multiple dyno runs. Call iA to arrange your next gathering here. I’d be happy to grill some burgers for you! 😉

Auto Enthusiast, BMW, buffalo run, concours, Porsche, road rally

Buffalo Run 2008 Pictures

It was another awesome year at the KC Magazine’s Buffalo Run 2008 version!  ImagineAuto had the pleasure of sponsoring the event for the third year in a row and we as usual, had a really great time.

Friday night’s event took place at Harrah’s Casino’s Voodoo Lounge.  With Cooranbong Vodka flowing freely, the Rally participants mingled with friends and competitors while listening to guest concert artist Gavin DeGraw.  While Gavin proved to be an interesting character, the event was a great time!  And Team ImagineAuto followed up the evening (well, it was actually already Saturday I believe) with a hearty Denny’s meal to get carbed up and raring to go for the Concours and Rally.

Five thirty a.m. arrived way too soon and as the cars were parked on the Plaza by 6:45.  It was a very cold but beautiful October morning and by mid-morning the streets of the Plaza were packed with participants and spectators alike.  Of course there was a ton of good-hearted trash talk that took place – most of it fueled by one Melvin…

IA’s 997TT actually headed back to the shop after the Concours to anticipate a rush of Rally participants as they stormed the shop for their piece of the deck on the Poker Run leg of the event.  That was a blast watching all of the cars squealing through our otherwise quiet business park setting and coming to a slow enough roll that our 6 year old, Quinn, could hand them a card out of the deck.  The plan was that if there was a close race at the end, the best poker hand would win.

From what we hear the Rally was a great drive and upon its end, landed the participants at Aristocrat Motors.  Congratulations to fellow ImagineAuto Team Rob and Leslie Dorrell who came in second place with their 2008 M5 BMW.

Oh, by the way, I’m back to bloggin’ – YES! 

911, 911 Porsche, 997TT, bilstein, Bilstein Coilover, Bilstein Damptronic, Bilstein PSS10, Bilstein PSS9, Bilstein suspension, Porsche, porsche performance, springs, suspension, turbo, turbo Porsche

On with the Mods….Suspension time! Bilstein Coilover heaven.

 

 

 

 

Originally when we bought the 997TT in from Chicago there were little in the way of modifications available. We created some in the form of tuning, worked with other companies to build intakes, etc. The one thing that simply was not available while leaving the PASM in place was suspension modifications. Knowing that the car was really not headed to the Dakar Rally we quickly teamed with Tech Art and waited until the first set of TA lowering springs hit American soil. Once in and on the car finally had a stance that we could be proud of.

The ride was firmer but like any lowering spring addition you always seem to find your self saying, does that rebound with the spring feel right….nah must be in my head. So we accepted that for the money it was certainly well worth the gain and the looks it created.

Over the summer we received a brand new Bilstein Dampstronic suspension. It has sat what feels like forever next to the couch in my office. Projects and day to day business certainly put the slow down on personal projects. So finally as we have found a small enough window to have installed my brand new suspension.

Unlike the suspension kits from Bilstein for past cars or current cars that would use the PSS9s or PSS10s this system doesn’t have the ability to control damping of the system by a knob on the top of the housing. The system remains completely PASM compliant and has all the workings to internally lock up the strut for a stiffer ride just like the factory. The difference is the progressive nature of the system. The more the system is pushed the more aggressive it becomes on the road. Drive to the grocery store and the system is very compliant and drives well. In fact much better than stock in my opinion. No bobbing, uneasy roll, very firm and sure on the road. Need a little more than that, hit the sport button and allow the system to lock it down and hit the track. This is without question one of the best improvements for the car both on the street and track use.

 

 

 

Install is pretty straight forward, pull the old ones off, install the new ones in the exact same fashion. This system is completely adjustable so ride height is open to the hearts content. I personally chose a GT3RS ride height. The alignment specs we chose are not that of GT3RS but one of a cross between the Gt2 and the TT. Win win for many situations and certainly daily driving.

 

911, 911 Porsche, 997TT, auto interior, Porsche, Porsche boost gauge, Porsche custom gauges, porsche performance, Projects, Sport Chrono, turbo Porsche

Custom gauge in a 997TT, sure why not.

What do you do when you have a dash of stock gauges that doesn’t lend its self to any space to do anything cool…As I love to say in other aspects of my life….create the space!! When I purchased my car it had to have the sport chrono in order to take advantage of the “sport” function Porsche offered. The 1850.00 upgrade not only included a more aggressive map, more boost, aggressive throttle response and a stiffer pasm program but it included this really cool gauge (not) in the middle of my dash. Just incase I live on a track I can keep up with my own time. Honestly I think the track slip is probably a better option but who am I to question Porsche’s thought process.

 

Factory gauge

We grouped up with a old buddy of mine who has started a gauge company called in your face gauges.  They specialize in many gauge application from Porsche to BMW and then some. We set up to do something in the 997TT that would set every other gauge into a boring category compared to this one. Understand that this is still under development but the base work is done on the gauge side. The function controls will eventually end up in the OEM computer stalk control or possibly the mirror control. Yes, both would remain functional with a toggle what would allow you to control the gauge and the proper OEM equipments.

This HD gauge is able to simply tap into the OBD2 port. In this case I have added not only all the available OBD2 data that is available through the plug, but we also added a boost module that takes its own source.  Other options for cars that do not have OBD2 like anything pre 96 you can add lots of stuff, as mentioned anything from boost to AFRs and then some.

The programming possibilities are endless with this setup. If you can’t find anything that you like in stock form you can also log into the company and actually request or down load a custom gauge faces! In addition to that you can have an analog setup, a plot setup, numbers, or your fancy custom gauge.

The unit we are using is a custom fit 52mm gauge that fit rather nicely in the stock sport chrono location….Nothing stays stock in my hands too long!

 

911, 911 Porsche, 997TT, Forced induction, GIAC, Porsche, Porsche exhaust, porsche performance, suspension, TT exhaust, turbo, turbo Exhaust, turbo Porsche, Uncategorized, Variable Vein Turbo, VTG

300 Mile 997 Twin with some added goodies. Our 610HP kit.

We have a very good customer that has sent various cars to us in the past. One of his priors was a very nice 91 965 that after 3 weeks of mods the car was truly to die for. As all things come to pass so did this car. No sooner than it sold I got a phone call that the new steed was on the way. In normal fashion the car made its way to KC for a list of mods. They include:

Our programming, Full suspension, intake, intercoolers, headers, exhaust, HF cats, short throw shifter, HRE P40s and tires. The car literally came to us with 300 miles on it and was never the same:) We do these mods on a pretty normal basis and the benefits are huge. While the TT has good power to begin with it lacks low end throttle response as well as a major dip in the power band at apx 5300 RPM due to goofy tuning from Porsche. The exhaust is very susceptible to heat and EGTs can be reduced by bringing back pressure down and increasing flow. The headers add TQ and the intake, well adds a little HP but really sounds great when you get on it =) That has to be worth something right…